DIS 2019 – Accepted Paper

Couldn’t be more please to find out today that I have a full paper accepted to DIS 2019! Very thankful for my amazing colleagues who provided invaluable support for and feedback on the paper.

Below is the title and abstract, will post a camera ready version in the coming weeks.

Pee paper provocation

Do you have to pee? A Design Space for Intimate and Somatic Data

The management of bodily excretion is an everyday biological function necessary for our physiological and psychological well-being. In this paper, I investigate interaction design opportunities for and implications of leveraging intimate and somatic data to manage urination. This is done by detailing a design space that includes (1) a critique of market exemplars, (2) three conceptual design provocations, and (3) autobiographical data-gathering and labeling from excretion routines. To conclude, considerations within the labeling of somatic data, the actuating of bodily experiences, and the scaling of intimate interactions are contributed for designers who develop data-driven technology for intimate and somatic settings.

Books Read in 2019

(continuously updated)

Nonfiction

Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ. Giulia Enders
The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins. Anna Tsing.
Counterproductive: Time Management in the Knowledge Economy. Melissa Gregg.
Designing with the Body: Somaesthetic Interaction Design. Kristina Höök.
The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power. Shoshana Zuboff.
Matters of Care: Speculative Ethics in More Than Human Worlds. María Puig de la Bellacasa.
Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World. Meredith Broussard.
The Diaper-Free Baby: The Natural Toilet Training Alternative. Christine Gross-Loh.

Fiction

The Island of Dr. Moreau. H. G. Wells.
The Invisible Man. H. G. Wells.
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. J. K. Rowling.
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. J. K. Rowling.
The Heart’s Invisible Furies. John Boyne.
Next Year in Havana. Chanel Cleeton.

Books read in 2018

Nonfiction

Purity and Danger: An Analysis of Concepts of Pollution and Taboo. Mary Douglas.
New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future. James Bridle.
Changing Things: The Future of Objects in a Digital World. Johan Redström and Heather Wiltse.
• Staying with the Trouble through Design: Critical-feminist Design of Intimate Technology. Marie Louise Juul Søndergaard.
Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene. Donna J. Haraway.
Design Things. Thomas Binder, Giorgio De Michelis, Pelle Ehn, Giulio Jacucci, Per Linde and Ina Wagner.
How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They’re Built. Stewart Brand.
On Trails: An Exploration. Robert Moor.
The Soul of America: The Battle for our Better Angels. Jon Meacham.
The Big Necessity: Adventures in the World of Human Waste. Rose George.
Designerly Ways of Knowing. Nigel Cross.
Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies. Jared Diamond.
Humanistic HCI. Jeffrey Bardzell and Shaowen Bardzell.
Crafting Experience: Designing Digital Musical Instruments for Long-Term Use in Artistic Practice. Ludvig Elblaus.
Making Design Theory. Johan Redström.
Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor. Virginia Eubanks.
Lab Coats in Hollywood: Science, Scientists, and Cinema. David A. Kirby.
Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams. Matthew Walker.
Toilet: Public Restrooms and the Politics of Sharing. Harvey Molotch and Laura Noren.
Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. Susan Cain.
Human-Machine Reconfigurations: Plans and Situated Actions. Lucy Suchman.
Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy. Richard E. Ocejo.
The 80/20 Principle: The Secret to Achieving More with Less. Richard Koch.
Machine Learners: Archaeology of a Data Practice. Adrian Mackenzie.
Weapons of Math Destruction. Cathy O’Neil.
Technology as Experience. John McCarthy and Peter Wright.
Making Preciousness: Interaction Design Through Studio Crafts. Vasiliki Tsaknaki.

Literary Nonfiction

French Children Don’t Throw Food. Pamela Druckerman.
The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. Michael Booth.
Outline. Rachel Cusk.
A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail. Bill Bryson.
Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel. Rolf Potts.
Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen. Christopher McDougall.
Tuesdays with Morrie. Mitch Albom.
Walden: Civil Disobedience. Henry David Thoreau.

Fiction

A Little Life. Hanya Yanagihara.
Cowboys Are My Weakness. Pam Houston.
Little Fires Everywhere. Celeste Ng.
Where the Crawdads Sing. Delia Owens.
The Summer Book. Tove Jansson.
Dubliners. James Joyce.
The Night Circus. Erin Morgenstern.
12 Short Stories: A Key to the Georgian Mentality. Archil Khantadze.
The Nightingale. Kristin Hannah.
Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine. Gail Honeyman.
All the Light We Cannot See. Anthony Doerr.
Rules of Civility. Amor Towles.
Small Great Things. Jodi Picoult.

KTH 2018 PhD Supervisory Panel

Today was our department’s annual PhD Supervisory Panel at KTH during which PhD students are given the opportunity to get feedback from senior researchers who act as “guest supervisors.” To prepare for my meeting with two Associate Professors I reworked my research abstract and research questions following my 30% seminar in October, during which Johan Redström from Umeå Institute of Design acted as my discussant. My goals in today’s supervisory panel were to get feedback on the new scope of my abstract and research questions relative to being only about 40% through my PhD (and I’m sure will continue to evolve), and identify important areas that I need to work on articulating to more firmly position my research in the context of how I am conceptually “furnishing” my design space. Considering I was presenting to senior researchers from different academic backgrounds than my own and each other, it was especially helpful to see within which aspect I felt misunderstood, i.e. where I need to sharpen my arguments. Below my poster summarizing my research thus far, followed by a few notes/reflections based on feedback received today, and a textual version of my abstract and research questions.

Karey Helms 2018 PhD Interaction Design Research abstract at KTH

Continue reading “KTH 2018 PhD Supervisory Panel” »

UID Wednesday Lecture 2018 – Crafting Humorous Fictions & Taboo Frictions

Yesterday I had the pleasure of spending the day at Umeå Institute of Design (where I did my MFA in Interaction Design). In the morning I spent a couple hours with upcoming IxD master thesis students to discuss my experience, and in the afternoon gave a talk titled “Crafting Humorous Fictions & Taboo Frictions” as part of the design school’s Wednesday lecture serious. Was great to be back, even if only for a day! Below is the abstract of my talk.

Karey Helms giving a talk on humor in design at Umeå Institute of Design

Talk abstract

Karey Helms is a PhD Student at KTH Royal Institute of Technology researching smart implicit interactions, those that are unseen or unnoticed yet proactively operate on our behalf. Her research through design approach includes speculative and autobiographical methods in which she designs humorous fictions and taboo frictions with intimate and somatic data to surface the social and societal implications of data-driven systems. These include the designing of fictional devices that predict when and how badly one has to urinate, and the prototyping of a genuine system to spy on her partner.

In this talk, she traces back her playful approach to fiction and friction to her master’s thesis in Interaction Design at UID and how she employed this approach while working in industry delivering actualized services within enterprise IoT prior to beginning her PhD. The aim of this talk is to advocate for humor in design and to craft experiences that disrupt and disturb to not only provoke others to think, but also yourself as a designer.